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Reflections of a Tomboy Grandma

Mon, Apr. 10, 2017 Posted: 02:10 PM


What is the most fundamental fact of human existence?

The 60 essays in this book cover a wide variety of topics—including joy, faith, unity, love, wisdom, suffering, death, grief, peace, and gratitude—but the overarching theme is that every human being is created by God in His image and has great worth. The implications of this truth in every facet of life are absolutely staggering. These essays begin to explore what this fact means in terms of how we view ourselves, how we perceive God, and how we treat others. Some of the pieces tell the unique stories of different individuals. Some talk about the character of this God who created us in His image—what He is like and what He is doing in the world. Others deal with how we should interact with other people, given that every person we meet has a profound God-given value.

Maybe you want no part of Christianity because of the behavior of Christians. Don’t throw it out; read this book to see how Christians ought to treat people. Maybe you are a believer who has given up on the church or given up on the Bible or even given up on God. Deep down you know there is nowhere else to go, but what once may have been a vibrant faith has become unsatisfying or unsettling. This book will give you hope that God is real, that His principles really do give a foundation for a life worth living, and that His church can be a place of genuine love and healing. And if you are a complacent Christian, be prepared to come under conviction; unless you lack ears to hear, you will find areas where you are falling short of fully living according to the truth that God created you and every human being in His image.

All of the ideas in the book are supported by Scripture and backed by rigorous exegesis, but the stories are readable and engaging. The principles are biblically and theologically sound, but there is no theology-in-a-vacuum; there is a clear connection between the deep truths of life and their practical outworkings in daily life. The book speaks of relationships of many kinds—with spouses, children, siblings, friends, fellow believers, ministry partners, colleagues, classmates, rivals, and enemies. It will strike a chord with people from the various communities mentioned in it, including persons with disabilities, marathon runners, obstacle racers, veterans, women, victims, refugees, pro-life advocates, the suffering, and the bereaved. In keeping with the theme that every person has great worth, many individuals—both well-known and unknown—are mentioned by name.

Allow yourself to be comforted, challenged, and convicted by this book. Consider giving it as a gift to someone who is feeling discouraged, depressed, lonely, or aimless. And if you never read this book, at least give some deep thought to the fact that every human being who has ever lived on this planet is created by God in His image and has immeasurable worth.

Diane Castro