Guest Views
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Christian Post Guest Voices

Guest authors provide news and commentary.

Posted 7/28/15 at 9:44 AM | Christian Post Guest Voices

Buying Bodies in America

America: Land of the free, home of the brave, and breeding ground for sex trafficking. While now a hot topic in mainstream media, the commercial sexual exploitation of children, women, and men has remained a covert crime in the United States, until now. However, many Americans still consider it to be a “third-world” problem and are oblivious to the fact that the third-world is in actuality their backyard.

The sex trafficking industry in America exists as a complex multi-billion dollar supply and demand operation. The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that 100,000 - 300,000 children are at risk of being trafficked each year, however, that’s putting it modestly. Because of its surreptitious nature, the exact number of trafficked survivors in America is nearly impossible to calculate. In my one-on-one interaction with survivors, I have learned that most choose to remain unidentified for fear of pimp retaliation, societal embarrassment, and/or little to no comprehension that they are victims of a crime. It was Harriet Tubman who said, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.” Awareness and prevention are critical in the eradication of sex trafficking. As citizens become educated on what it is and the signs to look for in potential victims, the lack of knowledge can no longer serve as a fuel to its existence. So, what is sex trafficking and what can you do to combat it? FULL POST

Posted 7/27/15 at 1:43 PM | Christian Post Guest Voices

How to Say 'No' to a Wonderful Opportunity

“They said to Him, ‘Lord! Everyone is looking for you.’ He said to them, ‘Let us go into the next towns, that I may preach there also, because for this purpose I have come forth'” (Mark 1:35-38).

Turning down a lousy request is no problem.

–“Hey Joe! Wanna go bungee jumping?” Ha. Not in this lifetime.

–“Hey preacher! How about a night of bar-hopping on Bourbon Street!” You talking to me, Leroy?

–“Pastor, would you write a book on the superiority of your theological system over all others?” Uh, no. But have a nice day.

Saying ‘no’ to something you hate to do, do not want to do, cannot do, and would not be caught dead doing–piece of cake.

No one has to counsel you on how to do that.

It’s all those other requests that you find difficult to turn down.

“Would you judge our city’s beauty contest?” Okay, no one has actually asked me to do that, but I live in hope. A preacher, if asked to do this, which I find inconceivable, should turn it down for a hundred rather obvious reasons. FULL POST

Posted 7/27/15 at 10:41 AM | Christian Post Guest Voices

What Marriage Advice Do You Listen To?

Today I thought I’d run an interesting guest post from anonymous reader Your Feathered Friend. She struggles with a chronic illness, and is trying to come to terms with needing help in everyday life when her husband just doesn’t “see” what she needs.

This is a theme in both my book To Love, Honor and Vacuum and in my upcoming 9 Thoughts That Can Change Your Marriage (which releases in less than a month!): sometimes the pat Christian answers to just “love your husband and he will show love back” don’t work, especially when you genuinely need help. So what do you do? She shares her struggles here, and I’d love to hear your take on it in the comments!
FULL POST

Posted 7/23/15 at 9:16 AM | Christian Post Guest Voices

My Single Biggest Regret In Ministry

I invite you to read this opening to my journal dated October 1980.

I was 40 years old and Margaret was 38. We were in our 19th year of marriage, and pastoring the First Baptist Church of Columbus, Mississippi. Our children were 17, 14, and 11.

The first entry in the book is dated October 9. However, the paragraph above that reads:

The month of October got off to a poor start around the McKeever household. I announced to Margaret that until October 27th, there were no open days or nights. The month was filled with church meetings, committees, banquets, associational meetings, speaking engagements at three colleges, a weekend retreat in Alabama, and a few football games. She cried. Once again, I had let others plan my schedule in the sense that I’d failed to mark out days reserved for family time.

I ran across that book today, read that paragraph, and wept.

The irony of this is that a year or two earlier, we had come through months of marital counseling and felt that we finally had a healthy marriage. In fact, one Sunday night six months after this journal entry, Margaret and I would take the entire worship service to tell the congregation of our marital woes, of our attempts to make this relationship work, of our extraordinary efforts to get counseling, which involved driving 180 miles round trip twice monthly for two-hour sessions with a professional therapist, and of the Lord healing our marriage. FULL POST

Posted 7/20/15 at 3:09 PM | Christian Post Guest Voices

Guarding My Marriage, By A Newly Wed

When I said, “I do,” I knew those two small words carried a very heavy load along with them. I have always known marriage is a commitment, and that commitment is what sustains love, and that marriage is work, and that nothing is perfect. I didn’t enter into my marriage with the naive notion that it was going to be easy, and love required nothing from me to sustain itself.

However, it was not until after I was married that I realized just how hard it is going to be. Now, let me just say that I am a newlywed. I have been married for almost 3 months. For pete’s sake, I haven’t even sent my thank you cards out yet so by no means am I calling myself an expert. I am actually the very opposite of that. That is why I am taking this so seriously. Marriages of supposed veterans and relationship gurus and spiritual leaders have crumbled under their own weight. I am constantly hearing and reading about failed marriages. Just yesterday we heard that Tullian Tchividjian stepped down from his pastorship because he and his wife were both involved in affairs. I mean, he is Billy Graham’s grandson- Billy Graham!- a man took so many well-known precautions and procedures to protect the sanctity and purity of his marriage. {Seriously, look it up!} Tchividjian wrote eight books about Christianity and current issues, and was married for almost fifteen years, and it would be the height of stupidity to think that marital failure could not happen to me. If he can fail at this, so can I. FULL POST

Posted 7/20/15 at 9:43 AM | Christian Post Guest Voices

Making a Good Faith Effort

“She hath done what she could” (Mark 14:8).

These days, my walking routine–long established but constantly taking different shapes–consists of two miles just before sunup. That requires some real self-discipline on these muggy summer mornings in the sultry South.

On days when, like today, the temperature at 6 am was in the low 80s and the humidity the high 80s, I cut myself a little slack. I anticipate being miserable out there, but know how critical exercise is for this 75-year-old body. So, even though I make myself get outside, I decide that “this morning I’m giving myself permission to make a good faith effort.”

I can cut the walk short if I choose.

In so doing, I’m making a statement to myself only that by being out here I’m still walking and still committed to taking care of this body. It means I’m bringing my body under subjection, as Paul puts it. And I’m being victorious. FULL POST

Posted 7/16/15 at 12:28 PM | Christian Post Guest Voices

Pluto, Hubble, and Why I Believe in Heaven

“You have covered the heavens with your majesty…. When I observe the heavens, the work of Your fingers, the moon and the stars which You set in place, what is man that You remember him…? Lord, our Lord, how magnificent is Your name throughout the earth!” (Psalm 8)

This has been quite a week for science lovers and everyone else.

The New Horizons spacecraft did a fly-by in the area of Pluto traveling at a comfortable 30,800 mph.

And sent back snapshots for our enjoyment.

Pluto is handsome and a little small for his age, but still quite the character. He’s definitely someone we wanted to know.

Pluto, we are told, is two-thirds the size of our moon. Its gravity is about 7 percent of ours. Its polar caps are made up of methane ice and nitrogen ice. A year on Pluto–one orbit around the sun–equals 248 of our years. (On Pluto, I would be not quite one-third of a year old!) Each day there–the time needed to rotate once on its axis–is the equivalent of 6.4 of our days. But that’s nothing…. FULL POST

Posted 7/14/15 at 3:14 PM | Christian Post Guest Voices

10 Things the Preachers Wife Can Give Him No One Else Can

“D. L. Moody found in his wife what he termed his balance wheel. With advice, sympathy and faith, this girl labored with him, and by her judgment, tact, and sacrifice, she contributed to his every effort.”  (quoted in “25 Surprising Marriages” by William Petersen)

The pastor’s wife is in a unique position.

She is close to the man of God but she does not come between him and God. She is privy to a thousand things going on between him and God, but must not insert herself into that process. She knows this man as no one else in the congregation does and can counsel/advise him as no one else is able, but she must know when to speak up and when to be quiet.

In many respects, she has the best seat in the house and the hardest job.

Pray for the young women newly married to men just beginning to pastor churches. So many of the skills they must master will come not from books but from life experiences, from making mistakes and getting things wrong, from befriending older and more mature ministers’ wives and heeding their counsel, and from the indwelling Spirit of God. FULL POST

Posted 7/13/15 at 11:11 AM | Christian Post Guest Voices

Why A Man Needs A Wife

“He who finds a wife finds a good thing” (Proverbs 18:22).

My friend Dr. Fred Luter, pastor of New Orleans’ Franklin Avenue Baptist Church, has an interesting way of introducing his beloved Elizabeth from the pulpit. He calls her “the love of my life, the apple of my eye, my prime rib, my good thing!”

Elizabeth has heard all that only a few thousand times, but she beams each time, as the congregation laughs and applauds.

My dad, Carl J. McKeever, who loved mom, Lois Kilgore McKeever, every day of his life, would say, “My rib is the best bone in my body.”

When the great C. S. Lewis married Joy Davidman, she moved into his house near Oxford and looked around. His home, called “The Kilns,” hadn’t been redecorated in decades. “The walls and carpets are full of holes,” Joy wrote. “The carpets are tattered rags.” She feared that moving the bookcases might cause the walls to cave in. FULL POST

Posted 7/13/15 at 10:13 AM | Christian Post Guest Voices

Why I Started A Company That Gives Away 50% Of It's Profit

People think I’m crazy for starting a company that gives away 50% of its profit to charity, but I think it’s pretty awesome. I understand the logistics of what giving away 50% of your companies profits means, but that’s exactly why I’m doing it. I want to make as big of a difference I can. Life is too short to not give back to others.

Americans consume 400 million cups of coffee per day, equivalent to 146 billion cups of coffee per year, making the United States the leading consumer of coffee in the world. And not to mention, coffee represents 75% of all the caffeine consumed in the United States.What if we could tap into this truth and help make the world a better place?
Here at Cause Roast, we believe the consumption of coffee has the power to change the world. Our goal is to provide high-quality, fair-trade coffee that gives 50% back to the world’s greatest causes and needs. Every bag of coffee purchased will help change the life of someone in need.

How Does It work?

Each month we will partner with a new organization and then at the end of that month write that organization a check for 50% of that months profit. It’s a simple process that I believe has the potential to help change millions of people. FULL POST

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