Author: Alliance Defending Freedom Senior Counsel Brett Harvey

Wars turn on single battles in key places that shift momentum, alter public perception, or redefine the nature of the entire conflict. Civil War buffs know that the fortunes of both the North and the South were changed forever on battlefields near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The infamy of the attack on Pearl Harbor was a stark reminder to the American people that remaining idle in the face of advancing tyranny does not protect people from danger. The battle on a wooden bridge in Concord, Massachusetts moved a struggle for the rights of British subjects into the American War of Independence.

The same is true for social conflicts. Harriet Beecher Stowe, a preacher’s daughter, was targeted by defenders of the South’s economic engine, but her book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, solidified the anti-slavery movement and inspired Abraham Lincoln, who later penned the Emancipation Proclamation. Susan B. Anthony defied the law and cast a single vote in the presidential election of 1872. When found guilty, she refused to pay the $100 fine and led the movement to give women the right to vote. Facing what critics called the inevitable rise of communism, Ronald Reagan stood in the center of Berlin, Germany — in the shadow of the “iron curtain” that shielded the communist bloc — and demanded “tear down this wall!”

History looks back on these momentous events with pride. But taking a stand in the midst of constant criticism and attack, when the outcome is anything but certain, takes courage and commitment. A small town in upstate New York is taking just such a stand. Greece, N.Y. is in the bullseye of a nationwide attack challenging the right of people to offer prayers to open public meetings.

On November 6, 2013, Alliance Defending Freedom and the firm of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher will defend this small town before the United States Supreme Court in Town of Greece v. Galloway. Opposing the town stands Americans United for the Separation of Church and State (AU), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the Freedom From Religion Foundation, among others.

The Supreme Court decision will be a watershed moment in a nationwide battle to define the liberty guaranteed by the First Amendment. At stake is the right of volunteer citizens to decide for themselves how they pray, and the right of a town to accommodate the beliefs of its citizens. The forces arrayed against the town are demanding that the town either stop opening prayers or censor the way people pray.

Opening public meetings with a prayer is a historic and cherished tradition that predates the founding of this nation. From the landing of the Mayflower, through the deliberations of the Continental Congress, and still continued in every state at every level of government, including the U.S. Congress, Americans seek Divine guidance and blessing on their deliberations. In 1983, the Supreme Court recognized this history and noted that Congress hired paid chaplains to open its meeting with prayer while they were writing the very words of the First Amendment. Finding such prayers unconstitutional would absurdly suggest that the framers of the Constitution were violating the document as they wrote it!

Despite the historical pedigree, AU and its allies want to redefine religious liberty to give them the right to silence or censor prayers simply because they don’t want to hear the way others choose to pray. Since 2004, more than 20 lawsuits have been filed, and hundreds of towns and counties across the country have been threatened in an effort to silence or censor prayers. Many towns and counties have given up under the threats of costly litigation. Now, all of the legal firepower is aimed at the Town of Greece. The stakes are high as the outcome of this case will help shape the definition of religious liberty in America. Alliance Defending Freedom is proud to stand with the courageous people of the Town of Greece.

If you support public prayer and think this valuable tradition should continue, sign the Statement of Support for prayer.

To learn more about the case and what’s at stake, visit www.FreeToPray.com.

This post originally appeared here.