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6/12/13 at 08:50 AM 0 Comments

New & Notable Books

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I am in the unique and enjoyable position of receiving copies of most of the latest and greatest Christian books and I like to provide regular roundups of some of the best and brightest of the bunch. Of all the books I have received recently, here are the ones that appear most noteworthy.

Pocket Dictionary Reformed Tradition by Kelly M. Kapic & Wesley Vander Lugt. According to the publisher, “Beginning to study Reformed theology is like stepping into a family conversation that has been going on for five hundred years. How do you find your bearings and figure out how to take part in this conversation without embarrassing yourself? The Pocket Dictionary of the Reformed Tradition takes on this rich, boisterous and varied tradition in its broad contours, filling you in on its common affirmations as well as its family tensions. Here you will find succinct and reliable entries on…” a whole series of theological terms and controversies, important names and councils, and so on. “The Pocket Dictionary of the Reformed Tradition is ready to assist you over the rough parts of readings, lectures, conversations and blogs. It will also be a companionable and concise introduction to one of the great Christian traditions.” (Learn more or buy it at Amazon or Westminster Books)

Name above All Names by Sinclair Ferguson and Alistair Begg. Alistair Begg and Sinclair Ferguson. Do we need to say a whole lot more than that? “Jesus Christ has been given the name above all names, the highest seat of honor, the right to reign and rule. Yet the busyness of our lives and the diversions of this world often distract us from knowing the most important person we could ever know. Perhaps we need some help to see Jesus afresh. In this thoughtful study and worshipful reflection, two influential pastors draw on decades of pastoral experience in order to guide us through the whole sweep of Scripture and examine seven key qualities of Jesus's identity and ministry. Name above All Names helps us to see and meditate on the incomparable character of Christ—a spiritual exercise that enables us to readily respond to the exhortations of Scripture, to focus our gaze upon the King of kings, and to better understand just how great Jesus really is.” (Learn more or buy it at Amazon or Westminster Books)

Sex and Money by Paul David Tripp. “Pleasure. We live in a world obsessed with finding it, passionate to enjoy it, and desperate to maintain it. Chief among such pleasures are sex and money—two pleasures unrivaled in their power to captivate our attention, demand our worship, and drive us to hide or to despair. You don't have to look far to see that we are in big trouble in both areas. Many of us see the battle. We feel the strain of the war. And we are eager for freedom in a world gone mad. Seasoned counselor and pastor Paul David Tripp pulls back the curtain on the lies that surround us and on the distortions we often overlook. As Tripp thoughtfully exposes the insanity of our culture, he also wisely speaks to our own tendencies to fall prey to sexual and financial idolatry. Sex and Money ultimately directs us to God's Word and the liberating power of the gospel, offering real-world advice, and giving us the guidance we need to find true joy and enduring satisfaction.” (Learn more or buy it at Amazon or Westminster Books)

Fanny Crosby: The Blind Girl’s Song by Lucille Travis. Trailblazers is an excellent series of biographies for young readers and the most recent volume is on the hymnwriter Fanny Crosby. If it is consistent with the rest of the volumes, it will be a great addition to the series and one to consider for the kids. (Learn more or buy it at Amazon)

Renewing the Evangelical Mission edited by Richard Lints. “The ‘culture story’ of evangelicalism during the second half of the twentieth century has been well told. It is important now to think about the theological mission of the church in an ever-increasing post-Christian and post-partisan context. What is the theologian’s calling at the beginning of the third millennium? How do global realities impact the mission of evangelical theology? What sense can be made of the unity of evangelical theology in light of its many diverse voices? This collection of essays draws together a stellar roster of evangelical thinkers with significant institutional memory of the evangelical movement who nonetheless see new opportunities for the evangelical voice in the years ahead.” Contributors include Os Guinness, Michael Horton, J. I. Packer, and many others. (Learn more or buy it at Amazon or Westminster Books)

And how about you? Are there some new and notable books that you’ve added to your reading list? Is there anything I’m missing?

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