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10/24/16 at 12:54 AM 0 Comments

Americans Turning the Remains of Dead into Memorial Diamonds

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The idea of developing diamonds from human ashes was first practiced in Switzerland over a decade ago. It is a long and expensive process that develops diamonds from the ‘Carbon and Nitrogen’ element-mass obtained from human ashes. Companies like, LONITE AG who are pioneer in this technology, are now promoting the idea outside Switzerland, in the USA and other parts of the world.

The diamonds they create from human ashes are optically same as the natural diamonds. But these have slight difference in the carbon atoms and chemical density. A customer can verify the purity of this diamond through the certificate provided by the company or by getting it tested by any Gemological and International Certification institute. It is measured in carat (ct).

To produce these diamonds, companies like LONITE AG create similar environment at their laboratory that is suitable for developing natural diamonds – High Temperatures and High Pressures (HTHP). They need to create and control temperatures up to 3000K and pressures up to 60000 Bars.

Further, it takes them between three and nine months to create a cremation diamond. And roughly 200-400g of ashes is consumed in the process depending on the size of the diamond ordered. Before processing the full mass of ashes, a small sample is tested for its contents and accordingly a cost and quality of product is estimated.

For customers in USA, LONITE AG collects the ashes and sends it to their Switzerland based workshop for initial testing and later processing. Once the ashes are tested, pure Carbon and Nitrogen mass is then extracted in the powder form. This mixture is further purified and then crystallized using HPHT technology (High-Pressure, High Temperature). Sometimes, Nitrogen is also filtered out from the carbon mass to develop clear (colorless) diamonds.

Each cremation diamond is naturally grown and is truly unique. No two diamonds are alike. The exact dimensions cannot be controlled or predicted. The final shape or size of the diamond depends on its natural shape. The expert professionals decide the diamond cuts based on its original form so as to keep the maximum size.

LONITÉ AG says its prices are highly competitive for the purity of its end product. It starts from USD2600, which is 0.25 carat big. Larger sizes have higher costs. The price of naturally colored diamonds is lower than its most pure colorless form. To save more on price, customers can also consider uncut/unpolished diamonds that are priced 25% lower.

With increasing awareness of this technology developing diamonds from human ashes, more and more people across the world are now creating memorial diamonds.

Earlier people chose to build different types of memorials of their deceased loved ones - like cremation urn monuments, glass encasements, customized cremation urns, stone markers and more. But now more customers are choosing memorial diamonds because this can accompany them anywhere anytime. In the USA, customers choose to mount their cremation diamonds into rings and pendants, making it look more beautiful and deep.

Furthermore, a quality assurance from companies like LONITE AG, greatly encourage the will of such customers to create a beautiful memorial. The company guarantees that they carefully label all their orders to avoid mixing, they also let their customers track the status of the order online and most importantly customer can also ask for a certificate of purity from SSEF, GIA or IGI which confirms that the diamond is 100% authentic and its origin is from their laboratory.

With cultural differences it may not be the best idea for everyone. But for the people who like the idea of staying connected with their loved ones, it is certainly valuable. The resulting diamond from cremation ashes can be an everlasting keepsake, or heirloom to pass to future generations.

CP Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of The Christian Post. Opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s).